Val Müstair

(c) Aline Oertli

In the extreme East of Switzerland lies the astonishingly beautiful Romansch-speaking Müstair valley, and within it the Minschuns ski slopes. Although the area is small it has affordable lift passes, queue-free lifts, uncrowded runs, family-friendly facilities and good options for going off-piste and ski touring. The population of the valley is around 1600, with the most significant villages being Müstair, Tschierv and Santa Maria.

Winter Sports
Minschuns
The Minschuns ski area is about 5km outside Tschierv, and 16km from Müstair. The valley lift station is at Era Sot where there is also free parking and a bus stop, “Tschierv, Talstation Minschuns”.
The planned opening and closing dates for the ski area in 2021/22 are Saturday, December 18, 2021 and Sunday, March 20, 2022.
The heart of the ski area is Alp da Munt at 2150m where the surface lift from the valley station terminates and where there is a beginners area serviced by a short surface lift. A longer surface lift connects Alp da Munt to the summit of Minschuns, from where a blue run descends to the runs served by the surface lift at Fantauna da S-charf. In total there are 10 pistes totalling 25km between 1,670m and 2,700m. 3km are rated black, 5km are rated red and 17km are rated blue. Additionally there are off-piste opportunities, and a trail from Minschuns all the way to Tschierv, snow conditions permitting.
There are 4km of cross-country at 2,180m, a winter hiking trail and a toboggan run.
An avalanche training centre is located at Alp da Munt.
An 8 man gondola is currently proposed between Tschierv and Alp da Munt.

Müstair and Tschierv
There are rinks in both villages for ice skating and ice hockey. It is also possible to play curling on the rink in Tschierv.

Getting There
By car: Landquart – Klosters – Vereina car transport – Zernez – Ofenpass.

By Public Transport
There are SBB train connections to Landquart, from where you take a Rhaetian Railway train to Zernez and then a Postbus. The SBB operate a door-to-door luggage service.

Mobility in the Valley
From the winter season 2021/22, guests can now use all public transport in the Münstertal from Buffalora to Müstair free of charge.
There is an hourly Postbus with a route between Zernez, Tschierv, Sta. Maria and Müstair. Less frequently a Postbus runs between Fuldera and Lü.
A free ski bus runs through the valley to the Era Sot ski lift valley station.
New to the valley is a BMW i3 rental electric car in Tschierv. For electric vehicles there are 8 charging points in 3 locations.

Accommodation
In Müstair there are the some well-regarded hotels: the historic Chasa de Capol, Wellnesshotel Liun, Hotel Münsterhof and Hotel Helvetia. In Sta. Maria there is the three star Hotel Schweizerhof and a youth hostel, whilst in Tschierv there is the Hotel al Rom. There are also various bed & breakfast establishments, self-catering apartments, farms offering accommodation and bunk houses in the valley.

Activities
In the ski area, there are two mountain restaurants, Alp da Munt and Alp Champatsch, as well as the Aunta snow bar. Restaurants throughout the valley provide regional specialities.
The smallest whiskey bar in the world, with an associated museum, can be found at the High Glen Distillery in Sta. Maria. The Antica Distilleria Beretta in Tschierv is also open for tastings and visits.
A guided tour is available through the UNESCO World Heritage St. Johann Monastery, Müstair. There is also the 17th Century Muglin Mall Flour Mill, the Tessandra hand weaving mill and the Chasa Jaura Valley Museum in Sta. Maria. Factory tours can be made of the pine joinery at Fuldera. At Buffalora there is an ancient Ore Mine (only visitable with a guide during the summer months).
The regional nature park that was established in Val Müstair in 2011 together with the Swiss National Park and parts of the municipality of Scuol, forms the first high alpine UNESCO biosphere reserve in Switzerland. Certified organic products from the reserve can be purchased at the producers and in all village shops.

Events
The Epiphany race (Dreikönigsrennen) for snowshoe runners and touring skiers takes place on 5th January 2022.
The Ortler Alpine School runs six day ski tours in the valley throughout the season: www.alpinschule-ortler.com/en/winter-tours-courses/offer-weeks-ski-touring-weeks/

Further information
Tourist Office: www.val-muestair.ch
Operating times of the ski lifts, mountain restaurant and bar Aunta, webcams, weather and snow reports: www.minschuns.ch
Ski and snowboard school Val Müstair: www.minschuns.ch / email: sdsvm@bluewin.ch
High alpine ski tours: www.val-muestair.ch/skitouren
Avalanche Training Centre: www.val-muestair.ch/de/avalanche-training-center
Cross-country skiing center Fuldera & snowshoe tours: www.aventueras.ch


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Swiss Winter Sports in 1925

Skijoring on the lake at St Moritz 1925

Although I have been skiing for over 50 years, I don’t have a great sense of it changing much since I first tumbled down a Scottish mountain. OK, we did wear some uncool ski outfits back then, nobody snowboarded and there were a higher proportion of surface lifts. But I don’t remember it being so different. Largely the same resorts and the same vibe in them.

Track back another 50 years, and what was often called ski running involved very long wooden skis, one stick and a pair of stout leather ski boots. And it was by no means the major attraction for people visiting the Alps in winter.

I’ve been reading “Things Seen in Switzerland in Winter”, written by Charles Domville-Fife in 1925. He writes that interest in visiting Switzerland was divided between those for whom it was termed “The Playground of Europe”, and those who went hoping to recover from tubercolosis.

Until 1946 there was no effective medication to treat tubercolosis, a disease that killed as many as one in four people in England in the 19th Century. Swiss mountain air and sunshine achieved a remarkable recovery rate in the clinics that sprung up in hitherto sleepy hamlets like Davos and Arosa in the late nineteenth century. And the therapeutic benefits were enjoyed as much, or even more, in the winter.

St Moritz had also become a popular destination for its winter sun and the many diversions organised in the sophisticated hotels there – the hotelier Badrutt taking a lot of credit for popularising winter holidays in the Engadine. In 1873 for the first time St Moritz recorded more winter visitors than summer ones.

One English visitor to Switzerland in the late nineteenth century was Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, who stayed in Davos where his wife was recuperating from tuberculosis. Ever impatient to be doing something, he imported some skis from Norway (where skiing had long been a practical means of transport) and became the first person to ski from Davos to Arosa – still a popular back country route. In 1893 he wrote an article in the English press of his experiences and helped popularise what was to diverge from Norwegian ski techniques to become what we now know as the sport of downhill skiing.

Skiing was by no means the only winter sport that became popular in Switzerland. Domville-Fife records that skating was introduced as a winter sport in 1876 (from England), curling (from Scotland) in 1882, tobogganing (from Canada) in 1884, ice hockey (also from Canada) in 1992 and the quaint sport of skijoring (from Scandinavia) in 1906.

In the second half of the nineteenth century Switzerland benefitted from a growing electrified rail system, opening up destinations such as the new sanatoria in Montana and Leysin, and new winter sports destinations like Klosters, Celerina, Grindelwald, Wengen, Murren, Gstaad, Villars, Engelberg and Andermatt. Adelboden later emerged as both a health centre and a ski destination, with the world’s first winter sports holiday package organised by Sir Henry Lunn in 1903. Outside of Switzerland, Chamonix and St Anton – both with rail links – were early adopters of sport skiing, St Anton claiming to have founded the first ski club in 1901.

Skiers demonstrate Telemark, Jump Turn and Christiana in St Moritz 1925

Most of the new winter sports were introduced by the British, but soon became popular with the Swiss and visiting Germans. The opening of the cog railways in winter in Grindelwald, Wengen and Villars are attributed to British requests that they be available outside the summer timetable.

It’s noteworthy that, at this time, British tourists tended to come over only in December and January, and what we now largely associate with the peak winter sports period was left to the locals. Domville-Fife declares that “at nearly all the best known resorts the predominance of British people during Christmas and New Year festivities is usually so great that even the Swiss themselves are scarcely seen. It is during this period and for about five weeks afterwards that a sojourn at any of the winter sports centres becomes one of the most delightful experiences of life”.

Domville-Fife, writing in 1925, doesn’t mention a single ski destination in the canton of Valais, now probably the pre-eminent ski region in the world. Champéry, in the Portes du Soleil did not have its first lift access to the slopes until 1939, Verbier’s first lift arrived in 1946, Saas-Fee a popular summer spa destination did not have road access until 1950 and Zermatt, although it has had the Gornergrat cog railway since 1898, was primarily known as a summer destination for climbers, and did not open the railway to the summit during the winter season until 1941. Only Montana (later Crans-Montana), had adopted skiing by 1925, following the opening of the funicular railway in 1911. However the village was still mostly popular for its sanatoria and, from 1906, for golfing.

Skijoring, meanwhile, has its adherents but has achieved only a limited popularity. Although my Swiss mother-in-law recalls skiing to school on skis, I don’t think it looks anything like this today at Aiglon College!

Switzerland - school in the sun 1925.
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Avalanche Risk Mitigation

The Swiss Institute for Snow & Avalanche Research (SLF) recorded 27 deaths from Avalanches in the winter season 2021/22 up to the end of March, double the number for the previous year and the moving average over the last 20 years. All the victims were winter sports enthusiasts on unsecured terrain – 11 back country and 16 off-piste – and a quarter were in the Verbier area.

Why do skiers and snowboarders get killed by avalanches, I have often been asked. Can’t they just ski out of the path of the snow slide?

Simply put, it is almost impossible to out-run an avalanche. A skier normally travels around 30km/hr, whilst an avalanche can exceed 100km/hr, faster than all but the fastest skier can travel in perfect conditions. Additionally a skier may not be aware that an avalanche has formed until it is upon them, as they can begin with little warning and an almost imperceptible change in the condition of the snow. Then, very rapidly, the force of the product of the mass and acceleration of the slab of snow is capable of knocking over anything in its way.

Just like a flood of water, it is possible to “float” on an avalanche by wearing and deploying an avalanche airbag. Without one, however, you will almost certainly be swept under. It is sometimes possible to “swim” through an avalanche, but swimming in an avalanche is not a skill the average victim will have.

An avalanche typically contains many hundreds or thousands of cubic metres of snow, and the snow consistency is often heavy once it settles. One cubic metre can weigh 500kg, so if you are under an avalanche that has settled you cannot normally lift yourself out of the snow. You would need to dig your way out, and that could well be through a substantial layer of snow. It may not even be clear which way is up. Your best chance of survival is that someone else is able to dig you out – assuming they know where to dig.

Even if a skier is conscious and knows which way is up when they have found themselves under an avalanche, the snow will likely encase them such that they are unable to move. The air pocket around their face will be unable to sustain them for more than a short period, perhaps a few minutes. 85% of avalanche deaths are due to asphyxiation.

The impact of the avalanche may well have made the skier unconscious or caused serious injury. In 15% of avalanche fatalities trauma is a factor. Avalanches often include debris such as trees and rocks, and in turn may sweep a skier on to rocks or other hard objects.

If a victim of an avalanche is not killed by the impact and is dug out within 5 minutes there is a 90% chance of survival. If they have been able to create a large enough air pocket a survival time of an hour is possible but is rare.

I have talked in an earlier article about how important it is to have some form of beacon, such as a RECCO reflector, in ski gear to improve the chances of being found. If you do survive an avalanche, it is likely because of some one else’s preparedness.


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End of Ski Season review

Phew! What a season it has been for skiing and snowboarding. I was fortunate to get some good skiing in before Christmas, but in general it has been a dismal season for everyone.

The Swiss lift operators association (Seilbahnen Schweiz/Remontées Mécaniques Suisses) has published its analysis of the season up until the end of March – which for all but a handful of resorts is end of season.

The lift operators report a grim picture. By the end of March, lift usage and turnover in Switzerland had fallen by 24% in total, compared to the 2018/19 winter season. Large resorts, dependent on international visitors, have suffered most, but the closure of bars and restaurants has also deterred local winter sports enthusiasts. Additionally, ski camps and club and business trips have not taken place. Ski lifts in the Prealps and in areas close to towns, which cater more for day tourists, have not done quite as badly. Ticino has actually done quite well compared to 2018/19, but that was a season where the canton suffered from a lack of adequate snow – something that cannot be said of this season, where the snow conditions remain very good in those resorts still open.

On the whole comparison with the 2018/19 season is more meaningful than for 2019/20, because Covid-19 had an impact on the latter part of the 2019/20 season. It was hard to forecast a year ago we would be where we are now, and it is only with some optimism that we can look forward to next year being without some restrictions. None the less, overseas visitors are booking in advance for next season like never before, with many winter tour operators reporting bumper bookings.

The long-term impact on the lift operators is hard to gauge. Despite running at a considerable loss this season, lift operators have seen themselves as providing a public service and largely remained open. If the ski lifts had closed, mountain regions would have faced a shutdown of even more tourist activities, resulting in greater economic damage than has anyway been inflicted. Government support, the lift operators association says, is needed to avoid systemic damage to tourism.

The impact on the whole winter sports infrastructure is devastating. Some businesses will not return, others will cancel plans for expansion or investment. Many resorts were already worried about the long-term impact of climate change, and Covid-19 is hardly likely to positively impact their thinking. Additionally, with ski resorts being amongst the Covid-19 hotspots at the start of the pandemic, the image of winter sports has suffered.

I think the ski industry will recover strongly, although the level of growth will likely be lower than in previous years. From a sustainability perspective and in light of the impact of climate change, that is probably not a bad thing.

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